A top DOJ official just outlined why the agency has everything it needs to go after Big Tech — and Facebook, Google, and Amazon should be nervous (AAPL, GOOGL, FB, AMZN)

The nation’s antitrust laws provide enforcement officials with all the tools they need to promote competition in the tech industry, Assistant Attorney General Makan Delrahim said Tuesday. Delrahim made the comments as the Department of Justice and the Federal Trade Commission are beginning to scrutinize Apple, Alphabet, Facebook, and Amazon. He also defended the DOJ against the charge that it focuses too much on consumer prices in weighing the effects of companies’ market power, acknowledging there can be other harms. Delrahim’s comments come as his own role in the investigating the tech companies has come under scrutiny. Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories. Makan Delharim thinks the current legal… Read More

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Pixel 4 rumors are heating up: motion sensing and a square camera bump

Google has been releasing Pixel phones in October for three years now, and so we’re expecting a Pixel 4 and a Pixel 4 XL this October too. Like clockwork, the leaks have begun, though at this early date it’s a little hard to nail down precise details with confidence. Still, there are a few pieces of information worth looking at, if only because the first set of rumors is plausible and the second set is weird — weird enough to be true. First, we have the traditional first leak for any phone: supposed cases and renders. The renders come from Pricebaba (by way of OnLeaks) and show a classic black… Read More

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Border Patrol Hack Shows How New Technology Makes Law Enforcement a Target

U.S. Customs and Border Protection collects a trove of data about travelers including photos, fingerprints, and details about social media accounts. Officials argue that the information helps prevent terrorists from entering the country, but it also opens the door to a serious problem: Hackers The CBP hammered the point home on Monday by disclosing a breach of as many as 100,000 license plate photos and images of travelers at one point of entry. Cybersecurity experts say it all comes down to a simple rule: The more data someone collects, the bigger the target it is for theft. As law enforcement begins to deploy and depend on new technology, such as… Read More

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