More Americans could die from coronavirus than those killed in battle during Civil War, White House projection shows

President Donald Trump and his leading health advisers dealing with the novel coronavirus pandemic offered some grim statistics for Americans in the weeks ahead. Statistical models showed that roughly 100,000 and 240,000 Americans could die from the disease — even if Americans observed the strict social distancing guidelines. The forecasted figures are an alarming when put in context with other pandemics and wars. Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories. President Donald Trump and his leading health advisers dealing with the novel coronavirus pandemic offered some grim statistics for Americans in the weeks ahead. Statistical models showed that roughly 100,000 and 240,000 Americans could die from the disease — even… Read More

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Analyst lowers Expedia profitability estimates again as questions swirl about future of travel

(GeekWire Photo) It’s unclear how the COVID-19 outbreak will change the way we travel. Will consumers be more wary of getting on a plane or staying in a hotel? Will remote work reduce corporate travel needs? Will the travel industry simply return back to normal? The uncertainty puts the future of travel companies up in the air. Seattle-based Expedia Group saw its stock price fall more than 100% this month amid the outbreak and travel restrictions around the globe. Coronavirus Live Updates: The latest COVID-19 developments in Seattle and the world of tech On Monday RBC Capital Markets again lowered estimates for Expedia’s key financial results after re-examining the impact… Read More

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Vericool raises $19.1 million for its plant-based packaging replacement for plastic coolers

Vericool, a Livermore, Calif.-based startup that’s replacing plastic coolers and packaging with plant-based products, has raised $19.1 million in a new round of financing. The company’s stated goal is to replace traditional packaging materials like polystyrene with plant-based insulating packaging materials. Its technology uses 100% recycled paper fibers and other plant-based materials, according to the company, and are curbside recyclable and compostable. Investors in the round include Radicle Impact Partners, The Ecosystem Integrity Fund, ID8 Investments and AiiM Partners, according to a statement. “We’re pleased to support Vericool because of the company’s track record of innovation, high-performance products, well-established patent portfolio and focus on environmental resilience. We are inspired by… Read More

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Vericool raises $19.1 million for its plant-based packaging replacement for plastic coolers

Vericool, a Livermore, Calif.-based startup that’s replacing plastic coolers and packaging with plant-based products, has raised $19.1 million in a new round of financing. The company’s stated goal is to replace traditional packaging materials like polystyrene with plant-based insulating packaging materials. Its technology uses 100% recycled paper fibers and other plant-based materials, according to the company, and are curbside recyclable and compostable. Investors in the round include Radicle Impact Partners, The Ecosystem Integrity Fund, ID8 Investments and AiiM Partners, according to a statement. “We’re pleased to support Vericool because of the company’s track record of innovation, high-performance products, well-established patent portfolio and focus on environmental resilience. We are inspired by… Read More

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Secretive big data company Palantir is reportedly providing software to help the CDC track the coronavirus pandemic, even as critics slam its work with ICE (AMZN)

Palantir is providing the CDC with software to help it monitor the spread of COVID-19 and assess how hospitals are dealing with spikes in new cases, Forbes reported Tuesday. Palantir’s software uses data from hospitals and public health agencies — such as test results, bed capacity, and ventilator supply — to give the CDC insight into where additional resources are needed, according to Forbes. The tool resembles one Palantir built for the UK’s top health agency and has raised significant privacy concerns, with sources telling Forbes that, while it uses anonymized data currently, personally identifiable information could be used in the future. Palantir, a secretive big data company, built has… Read More

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