Alex Jones hit with $45.2 million defamation verdict — but could pay much less

Alex Jones speaks to supporters of President Donald Trump during a protest on December 12th, 2020 | Photo by Stephanie Keith/Getty Images A Texas jury has ordered Alex Jones to pay around $45.2 million for spreading a false conspiracy theory about the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting. The punitive damages come on top of a $4.1 million verdict from yesterday, potentially marking a major blow to Jones’s Infowars media empire. But the number could be vastly reduced by limits built into the Texas legal code, which caps damages on defamation punishments. The jury handed back its verdict on Friday after hearing testimony about Jones’s finances — something he’s allegedly taken… Read More

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TikTok moderators say they were shown child sexual abuse videos during training

Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge A Forbes report raises questions about how TikTok’s moderation team handles child sexual abuse material — alleging it granted broad, insecure access to illegal photos and videos. Employees of a third-party moderation outfit called Teleperformance, which works with TikTok among other companies, claim it asked them to review a disturbing spreadsheet dubbed DRR or Daily Required Reading on TikTok moderation standards. The spreadsheet allegedly contained content that violated TikTok’s guidelines, including “hundreds of images” of children who were nude or being abused. The employees say hundreds of people at TikTok and Teleperformance could access the content from both inside and outside the office… Read More

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Microsoft trackers run afoul of DuckDuckGo, get added to blocklist

Enlarge (credit: Aurich Lawson) DuckDuckGo, the privacy-minded search company, says it will block trackers from Microsoft in its desktop web browser, following revelations in May that certain scripts from Bing and LinkedIn were getting a pass. In a blog post, DuckDuckGo founder Gabriel Weinberg says that he’s heard users’ concerns since security researcher Zach Edwards’ thread that “we didn’t meet their expectations around one of our browser’s web tracking protections.” Weinberg says that, over the next week, the company’s browser will add Microsoft to the list of third-party tracking scripts blocked by its mobile and desktop browsers, as well as extensions for other browsers. “Previously, we were limited in how we… Read More

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Cyberattack on Albanian government suggests new Iranian aggression

Enlarge / Tirane, Albania. (credit: Pawel Toczynski | Getty Images) In mid-July, a cyberattack on the Albanian government knocked out state websites and public services for hours. With Russia’s war raging in Ukraine, the Kremlin might seem like the likeliest suspect. But research published on Thursday by the threat intelligence firm Mandiant attributes the attack to Iran. And while Tehran’s espionage operations and digital meddling have shown up all over the world, Mandiant researchers say that a disruptive attack from Iran on a NATO member is a noteworthy escalation. The digital attacks targeting Albania on July 17 came ahead of the “World Summit of Free Iran,” a conference scheduled to… Read More

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Code in the Google TV app suggests 50 free TV channels are coming

Wouldn’t it be neat if you could get free streaming TV channels without downloading an app or signing up for a new service? Well, you just might be getting that soon if you’re Google TV user, 9to5Google has decompiled the latest version of the software and reports the company’s TV streaming platform (formally Android TV) contains text that hints at 50 included live TV channels. The purported new feature seems to be called “Google TV Channels” based on text found in the launcher app. And there’s also an image in the software that hints at what channels will be included in the new service. It’s the usual lineup of internet-streamed… Read More

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One of the most useful Windows 11 tools is coming to Windows 10

Microsoft is bringing pin-protected printing to its Windows 10 operating system – a feature that actually premiered on Windows 11. The tech giant has a “scoped set of features” that it plans to bring over from Windows 11 in order to make bridging over from Windows 10 more natural, which are due to be shared between the operating systems in the near future. In an effort to avoid duplicate printouts, especially in busy offices and workplaces, Windows 11 (and now Windows 10) users are able to set a pin on their computer. The file(s) will only be printed once this pin is inputted into the printer. Pin-protected printing on Windows… Read More

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Fecal fountains: CDC warns of diarrheal outbreaks linked to poopy splash pads

Enlarge / A 2-year-old enjoys the spray of water in a splash pad in Los Angeles on June 20, 2022. (credit: Getty | Al Seib) In this summer’s record-blazing heat, a spritz of crisp, cool water sounds like delicious bliss. Each drop offering brisk relief as it pitter-patters on your face, quenching your sizzling skin. But if you find such euphoric respite at a children’s splash pad, that soothing spray could quickly turn to a sickening spew, as the drips and drops may be doused with diarrheal pathogens. Each patter may offer a splat of infectious germs that, if accidentally ingested, could transform you into a veritable fecal fountain in… Read More

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Intel denies Meteor Lake is delayed to 2024, says consumer chips will launch in 2023

Intel had an incredibly rough quarter, unexpectedly losing half a billion dollars due to a PC purchasing slump, and yesterday seemed like more bad news — a report from TrendForce about manufacturing delays sparked rumors that Intel’s next big flagship processor Meteor Lake would be delayed until 2024, which would put it as much as a year behind schedule. (In a February investor meeting, Intel said that Meteor Lake would be “powering on” this summer before shipping in 2023.) However, Intel is flatly denying those rumors today, with spokesperson Thomas Hannaford clarifying to The Verge that not only are they untrue, but that Meteor Lake will actually ship, launch, and… Read More

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Reminder: Passkeys are not just from Apple

Illustration by Maria Chimishkyan When Apple introduced passkeys, its implementation of FIDO Alliance’s password-less secure authentication technology, the company did it in the most Apple way possible. It made an icon and printed a very on Apple brand-looking “Passkeys” next to it, complete in the San Francisco font. And if you’ve watched only part of the WWDC presentation on Apple’s passkeys, it’s possible to assume passkeys are an exclusive feature of Apple’s iCloud Keychain. Just a reminder: it’s not. The term “passkey” will also be used by major players Microsoft and Google. It’s used as a common noun and can be pluralized or singular, for instance: “you should set a… Read More

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Falling Space Debris is a Bigger Menace Than Ever

History remembers October 4, 1957, a lot better than it remembers January 4, 1958—though in recent weeks, the second date is coming to loom larger than the first. October 4, 1957, was the day the Soviet Union Launched Sputnik—the world’s first satellite—an achievement that heralded the start of the space age. “RUSS SATELLITE CIRCLING EARTH,” shouted the Los Angeles Times in a banner headline. “REDS FIRE ‘MOON’ INTO SKY,” answered the Chicago Daily Tribune. There was no such hyperventilating, however, three months later to the day, when the little 84 kg (184 lb.), beachball-sized satellite, having slowly lost altitude due to atmospheric drag, fell from the sky, burning up like… Read More

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Fish Oil Is Good! No, Bad! No, Good! No, Wait …

At first, it was all very exciting. In 1971, a team of Danish researchers stationed on Greenland’s northwest coast found that a local Inuit community had remarkably low levels of diabetes and heart disease. The reason, the researchers surmised, was their high-marine-fat diet—in other words, fish oil. Incidence of heart disease, which once afflicted relatively few Americans, had shot up since the turn of the century, and here, seemingly, was a simple solution. “I remember how exciting those studies were when they first came out,” Marion Nestle, a professor emerita of nutrition and food studies at NYU, told me. “The idea that there were populations of people who were eating… Read More

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It’s happening: Canon is finally answering our calls for cheaper mirrorless cameras

The Canon EOS R7 next to the two RF-S lenses the camera giant has announced (so far) (Image credit: Canon) Even if you’re not in the market for a vlogging camera, the arrival of another APS-C model would be a good sign for affordable Canon cameras. As our Canon’s recent launch of the mid-range EOS R7 and EOS R10 was great news for those of us who can’t afford to splash out on full-frame flagships – and it seems the camera giant could be following them up with another temptingly affordable model. The reliable Canon Rumors has claimed that “Canon’s next RF-mount camera is in the field” and will be… Read More

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Production problems dash dreams of a Nintendo Switch Pro

(Image credit: Nintendo) Furukawa doesn’t sound hugely confident about either side of that. “I’m not optimistic if I’m asked if I can sell all of them, even if I can produce the amount I expected,” he said. Don’t expect the Switch Pro to emerge anytime soon, and prepare for an even longer wait as global semiconductor supply issues continue to disrupt the industry.  Regardless of the production problems, Nintendo may be in no rush to replace the current Switch models. According to Nintendo looks unlikely to release a new console this year, as ongoing supply issues disrupt the production of its current hardware. Following the launch of the Nintendo Switch… Read More

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Meta just killed another service and, maybe with it, some shopping potential

Meta is shutting down yet another service. This time, Facebook Live Shopping will go offline on October 1, 2022. Starting on that date, no one will be able to host any new or scheduled shopping live streams. Facebook Live will remain, but you won’t be able to tag products in those videos nor create product playlists, according to the announcement. The social media platform encourages people to save their previous live streams and links to a set of instructions on how to do so. Live Shopping is shutting down because Meta wants to focus on Reels as its main video platform. Facebook claims people are watching short-form videos more often… Read More

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